The Sixties Radical-American Heros You Never Knew About

Here are some more Black Americans who fought along side their white counter parts during the Revolutionary War. You like me have never read or heard about these brave men.

The Left and leftist high school teachers and college professors have omitted these stories in a blatant attempt to paint this country as a racist country.

These purposeful omissions have gone unchecked until recently when conservatives began digging into the real history of this country not the fake one that is taught in today’s classrooms.

Crispus Attucks born 1723died 1770.

All of this information is taken from footnote.com

The protomartyr of the Revolutionary war was Crispus Attucks, a Negro, who was the leader in the Boston massacre on that memorable 5th of March, 1770. Attucks led the citizens in the charge, shouting, “The way to get rid of these idlers is to attack the main guard; strike at the root; this is the nest!” These were perhaps his last words, as his men threw a shower of clubs, stones and brickbats at the soldiers, which they returned with a galling fire. Attucks was the first to fall, being conspicuous on account of his height, which was six feet and two inches, and the still more important fact that he was in advance of his men. Two others, Samuel Gray and Jonas Caldwell, were killed, while Samuel Maverick and Patrick Carr, an Irishman, were mortally wounded. Attucks and Caldwell were buried from Faneuil Hall, afterwards called the “Cradle of Liberty,” the other two from their homes, but all four in one common grave, with the following epitaph on their monument.

“Long as in freedom’s cause the wise contend,
Dear to your country shall your fame extend;
While to the world the lettered stone shall tell,
Where Caldwell, Attucks, Gray and Maverick fell.”

Crispus Attucks was a man of some learning, and sometime before his tragic death indited the following letter to the Tory Governor of Massachusetts:

On March 5, 1770, Crispus Attucks and a noisy group of Boston Patriots were jeering and “pestering” a contingency of British Redcoats who were sent from England to keep the American colonists in check.

The patriots were a mixed group of disgruntled sailors, dock workers, servants, and apprentices. This group was tired of the steady appearance of the British soldiers amongst them. It is said that a group of seven British soldiers came across the Boston Commons facing the Customs House. Attucks took the lead and waved a group of colonists toward the armed soldiers. The British armed soldiers used their bayonets and pushed the congregating colonists aside and forbade them from assembling in groups.

Ideas of Liberty were being amply discussed by most colonists. A tense moment came when Attucks and four other white patriots moved closer toward the British soldiers. “Let us drive out these ribalds. They have no business here.” Attucks lunged forward with his “cordwood club” and beckoned the furious crowd to move in and disarm the British soldiers. Attucks was immediately struck twice in the chest by the British and killed. These shots were then followed by a series of others. Historical records listed four others killed: Samuel Gray, James Caldwell, Samuel Maverick, and Patrick Carr.

For the colonists, this was an outrage, and it became known as the BOSTON MASSACRE. Crispus Attucks’ race was secondary to his exemplary heroism and outspoken call for liberty for the American colonists. Attucks’ martyrdom is said to have acted as a catalyst for the American colonists’ eventual war for liberty and freedom from British rule. This war became the American Revolutionary War.

Crispus Attucks and his compatriots were buried in a common grave in Boston. In 1888, the city of Boston erected a bronze and granite statue on the Boston Common to recognize Attucks as the “first to die for independence.”

Crispus Attucks was one of more than 5,000 Blacks, who fought for independence during the American Revolutionary War up until it ended with British General Cornwallis’ surrender at Yorktown on October 19, 1781.

Birth: 1723

Death:  Mar. 5, 1770, Boston

BURIED: Granary Burial Ground

Boston
Suffolk County, Massachusetts

 

PRINCE ESTERBROOKS

African Americans played a role on the battle field from the beginning. At the first battles of the revolution, Lexington and Concord, there were ten African Americans. Prince Esterbrooks was described as “the first to get into the fight.” Esterbrooks was wounded during a battle at Lexington. The Salem Gazette or Newberry and Marblehead Advertiser for April 21, 1775 gives the name of Prince Esterbrooks “(Negro man)” as “wounded (Lexington).

 

PETER WILLIAMS Clergyman

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When the British took control of New York City, where Williams lived, he moved to New Brunswick, New Jersey. His son later wrote about his father: In the Revolutionary War, my father was decidedly an advocate of American Independence, and his life was repeatedly jeopardized in its cause…He was living in the State of [New] Jersey, and Parson Chapman, a champion of American liberty of great influence throughout that part of the country, was sought after by the British troops. My father immediately mounted a horse and rode round his parishioners to notify them of his danger, and to call on them to help in removing him and his goods to a place of safety.

Black Soldiers of the Revolutionary War from Plymouth County :

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a list of soldiers identified as “Negro,” “Black,” or “Mulatto,” compiled from recruiting documents in the collection of the Pilgrim Society, by Jeremy D. Bangs, Visiting Curator of Manuscripts, Pilgrim Hall Museum. ( c The Pilgrim Society, 1996)

Silas Accro, age 29, from Plymouth, Col. Theo. Cotton’s regiment
Pero Blakely, age 28, from Bridgewater, Maj. Cary’s regiment
William Blye, age 43, from Rochester, N. Hammond’s company, Col. Sprout’s regiment
Peter Booth, age 17, from Marshfield, Lt. Col. Hall’s regiment
James Bowes, age 17, from Plymouth, Col. Theo. Cotton’s regiment
Calla Brown, age 44, from Scituate, Lt. Col. Hall’s regiment
Primuss Cabuss, age 16, from Bridgewater, Maj. Cary’s regiment (probably identical with Prince Cobus)
Prince Cobus, age 16, from Bridgewater, Maj. Cary’s regiment
Henry Cook, age 38, from Bridgewater, Maj. Cary’s regiment
Solomon Dick, age 18, from Middleborough, Lt. Col. White’s regiment
Joseph Fowler, age 26, from Pembroke, Lt. Col. Hall’s regiment
Asher Freeman, age 23, from Scituate, Lt. Col. Hall’s regiment
Benjamin Gould, age 16, from Wareham, Gibbs’ company, Lt. Col. White’s regiment
Camaramsawde Gould, age 17, from Wareham, Gibbs’ company, Lt. Col. White’s regiment
Jack Hammond, age 26, from Bridgewater, Maj. Cary’s regiment
Peter Haskell, age 33, from Rochester, Briggs’ company, Lt. Col. White’s regiment
Bristol Howard, age 43, from Bridgewater, Maj. Cary’s regiment
Cato Howe, age 25, from Plymouth, Col. Theo. Cotton’s regiment
Jeremiah Jones, age 26, from Bridgewater, J. Allen’s company, Maj. Cary’s regiment
Winsor Little, age 17, from Scituate, Lt. Col. Hall’s regiment
Quash Mathrok, age 24, from Bridgewater, Daniel Packard’s company, Maj. Cary’s regiment
John McCarter, age 22, from Marshfield, Lt. Col. Hall’s regiment

Cuff Mitchell, age 33, from Bridgewater, Washburn’s company, Maj. Cary’s regiment
Prince Newport, age 30, from Plimpton, N. Hammond’s company, Col. Sprout’s regiment
Robert Peagin, age 36, from Bridgewater, Kingman’s company, Maj. Cary’s regiment
William Pittman, age 28, from Bridgewater, Maj. Cary’s regiment
Andrew Pompy, age 33, from Bridgewater, Maj. Cary’s regiment
Quamany Quash, age 17, from Plymouth, Col. Theo. Cotton’s regiment
Jubiter Richards, age 30, from Bridgewater, Kingman’s company, Col. Mitchell’s regiment
Toney Rose, age 18, from Middleborough, Churchill’s company, Lt. Col. White’s regiment
Nehamiah Samson, age 16, from Scituate, Lt. Col. Hall’s regiment
Ceasor Smith, age 24, from Plimpton, Col. Cotton’s regiment
Cesar Steward, age 29, from Pembroke, Lt. Col. Hall’s regiment
Zeba Sutton, age 17 from Scituate, Lt. Col. Hall’s regiment
Toby Tolbert, age 45, from Bridgewater, Nathaniel Packard’s company, Maj. Cary’s regiment
Jack Tomson, age 40, from Kingston, Capt. Rider’s company, Col. Theo. Cotton’s regiment
John Troy, age 21, from Bridgewater, Allden’s company, Maj. Cary’s regiment
Plato Turner, age 28, from Plymouth, Capt. Rider’s company, Col. Theo. Cotton’s regiment

Salmon Washburn, age 23, from Bridgewater, Allen’s company, Maj. Cary’s regiment
John Williams, age 26, from Kingston, Lt. Simmons’ company, Col. Theo. Cotton’s regiment
Uriah Williams, age 29, from Middleborough, Lt. Col. White’s regiment

SOURCE: http://www.pilgrimhall.org/natamdocs.htm#revolutionary%20war

My question to anyone on the Left, The Democratic Socialist Party and all you race baiters out there how come our Founding Fathers let Black men fight along side of them if they were racists?

Once again the Left are a bunch of lairs.

 

 

 

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