The Sixties Radical Azriel

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G-d guided Avraham to step outside his earthly thinking and showed him what was HE going to do for Avraham. Avraham was G-d’s servant and his reward was we Jews would be as numerous as the stars in the sky. Yet with this comes a huge responsibility. We are to prevent people from stumbling and falling away from G-d and pave the way for Yeshua to come back.

This weighs heavily on my heart. Many times I have stumbled and fallen short of this and thus I ask G-d to forgive me. I repent change my mind, and return to the L-rd. On daily basis I ask the L-rd of my life Yeshua to forgive me.

After his victory over the invading coalition, Abraham was concerned that his miraculous victory in battle was his full compensation for his accrued merits, thereby supplanting the other rewards G‑d previously promised him, namely: offspring and the Land of Israel. G‑d thereupon reiterated His promises to Abraham.

[G‑d told Abraham,] “Look toward heaven and count the stars – if you can count them! That is how your descendants will be.” Genesis 15:5

Although the plain meaning of this statement is that the Jewish people will eventually be as numerous as the stars, its metaphorical meaning is that they will sparkle like the stars; their light is so bright that even those walking in the thick of night will not stumble. We are all Abraham’s “shining stars,” possessing sufficient moral and spiritual fortitude to prevent those around us from stumbling and to exert a positive influence on them.1 HaYom Yom, 5 Marcheshvan.

http://www.chabad.org/dailystudy/dailywisdom.asp?tdate=11%2F10%2F2016

The Sixties Radical Azriel

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This is a very telling point. Son of Noach Shem is actually Malki-tzedek, king of Salem. Avraham gave tribute to honour him by giving him ten percent of his spoils of war. This is G-dly. This was due to the fact HaShem gave Avraham a miraculous victory over his enemies.

Malki-tzedek is the ancestor of Avraham.

For everything we have comes from G-d.

Abraham’s nephew Lot had accompanied him to the Promised Land. Abraham was too idealistic for Lot, so Lot left him, settling near the Dead Sea. When the Land of Israel was later invaded by a coalition of nations who captured Lot, Abraham pursued them in his defense. After Abraham miraculously defeated the invaders, he gave a tenth of the spoils of war to his ancestor, Noah’s son Shem, who was then known as Malki-tzedek, king of Salem.

He gave him a tenth of everything. Genesis 14:20

Tithing our wealth expresses our awareness that everything we possess really belongs to G‑d and must therefore be used for holy purposes. Generally, we amass wealth in order to improve our lives and the lives of our loved ones; the more we internalize the Torah’s values, the more these motives fuse with our desire to make the world more G‑dly.

However, when unearned wealth comes our way, it might not occur to us to relate to it in the same way. By tithing the spoils of war, which he received miraculously, Abraham demonstrated that not only the wealth that we have produced ourselves belongs to G‑d, but all our wealth.

G‑d promises to pay us back many times over for giving Him our tithes, and in fact implores us to test Him in this. By following Abraham’s example even with our unearned wealth, our lives will demonstrate how G‑d rewards those who fulfill His will. In this way, we, like Abraham, will disseminate the knowledge of G‑d’s goodness and kindness throughout the world.1 Likutei Sichot, vol. 5, pp. 68–76

http://www.chabad.org/dailystudy/dailywisdom.asp?tdate=11%2F09%2F2016

The Sixties Radical Azriel

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There are times when a stern word is necessary, when a child needs a firm reminder, when social justice demands harsh measures.

Of their own, these acts are unwholesome—only their context redeems them.

Think of them as toxic medicines, to be administered with great care. Once they are no longer necessary or can be replaced with more wholesome means, they are no longer medicine, but poison.

Likkutei Sichot, vol. 15, p. 39

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/39804/jewish/Unnecessary-Evil.htm

The Sixties Radical Azriel

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Why do parents love their children? Because the lower world reflects the higher world. And above, there is a Parent and He loves His children.

Why do parents of an only child have such unbounded love for their child? Because this is the truest reflection of the world above: Above, each one of us is an only child, and His love to us is unbounded.

Torat Menachem 5745, vol. 2, p. 1121. Ibid., vol. 3, p. 1725

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/52911/jewish/The-Only-Child.htm

 

The Sixties Radical Azriel

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Avraham showed us how to honour G-d by building our relationship with HIM. Avraham built three altars in three different locations and these represent our relationship with G-d.

In the course of his travels throughout the Promised Land, Abraham built altars to G d in three different locations.

 He built an altar to G‑d. Genesis 13:18

The three altars that Abraham built express the three levels through which we can ascend in our relationship with G‑d. Abraham built his first altar to thank G‑d for the promise of sustenance, children, and a land in which they could live. This corresponds to observing G‑d’s commandments, which gives life to the soul and sustains its connection to the body.

Abraham built his second altar to acknowledge the Divine gift of repentance. This altar expresses how we deepen our relationship with G‑d in order to restore it after having sinned.

Abraham built his third altar purely for the sake of glorifying G‑d. This altar expresses our ability to abandon our sense of independent selfhood and fuse with Him. All reality will fully attain this level of Divine consciousness only in the Messianic Era, but our awareness of this fact fuels our yearning for the Messianic Era, and G‑d will hasten its arrival commensurate with our yearning for it.1Likutei Sichot, vol. 30, pp. 40–43.

http://www.chabad.org/dailystudy/dailywisdom.asp?tdate=11%2F08%2F2016

The Sixties Radical Azriel

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Avraham was thrust into a pagan world. It looked like Avraham would fail yet G-d turned it around and those that mocked him now served Avraham. This is what happens when I turn my life over to G-d and serve HIM.

My G-d is greater than all. HE is the maker of heaven and earth. All other g-d’s will bow down to HaShem  the G-d of my father’s Avraham, Yitz’chak, and Ya’akov.

The first challenge Abraham faced in the Promised Land was the famine that set in immediately upon his arrival, forcing him to temporarily relocate to neighboring Egypt.

 When Abraham came to Egypt . . . Genesis 12:14

Instead of being allowed to pursue his monotheistic revival in G‑d’s Promised Land, Abraham was thrust into the world’s most prominent bastion of paganism. How ironic it must have seemed to witness this ambitious monotheist suddenly reduced to seeking the mercy of a cultural environment that mocked his every ideal.

Yet, in a miraculous reversal of fortune, Abraham soon had the Egyptians begging him for mercy, and shortly thereafter returned to the Land of Israel with greater wealth, with a greater reputation, and accompanied by Hagar, the Egyptian princess who would, in time, become the mother of Ishmael, his first child. It thus became retroactively clear that this apparent regression was actually a further stage in Abraham’s progression toward his goals.

Similarly, we must never be intimidated by the world – neither by the world outside us nor by the “world” of personal desires, fears, or preconceived notions within us. Once we answer G‑d’s call to “go, to yourself,” we are no longer bound by the limits of our own capabilities; even apparent regressions will ultimately prove to be an integral part of the process leading to ever-higher realizations of our Divine purpose in life.1 Likutei Sichot, vol. 5, pp. 58–63.

http://www.chabad.org/dailystudy/dailywisdom.asp?tdate=11%2F07%2F2016

The Sixties Radical Azriel

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Avraham- our teacher was the first evangelist. He converted many people to the belief in the one true G-d of my father’s Avraham, Yitz’chak, and Ya’akov. He was the greatest evangelist of all time.

The first challenge Abraham faced in the Promised Land was the famine that set in immediately upon his arrival, forcing him to temporarily relocate to neighboring Egypt.

When Abraham came to Egypt . . . Genesis 12:14

Instead of being allowed to pursue his monotheistic revival in G‑d’s Promised Land, Abraham was thrust into the world’s most prominent bastion of paganism. How ironic it must have seemed to witness this ambitious monotheist suddenly reduced to seeking the mercy of a cultural environment that mocked his every ideal.

Yet, in a miraculous reversal of fortune, Abraham soon had the Egyptians begging him for mercy, and shortly thereafter returned to the Land of Israel with greater wealth, with a greater reputation, and accompanied by Hagar, the Egyptian princess who would, in time, become the mother of Ishmael, his first child. It thus became retroactively clear that this apparent regression was actually a further stage in Abraham’s progression toward his goals.

Similarly, we must never be intimidated by the world – neither by the world outside us nor by the “world” of personal desires, fears, or preconceived notions within us. Once we answer G‑d’s call to “go, to yourself,” we are no longer bound by the limits of our own capabilities; even apparent regressions will ultimately prove to be an integral part of the process leading to ever-higher realizations of our Divine purpose in life.1 Likutei Sichot, vol. 5, pp. 58–63.

http://www.chabad.org/dailystudy/dailywisdom.asp?tdate=11%2F07%2F2016